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TRIBUTES
Tributes

Below you will find previously submitted letters and tributes to the men and women who are currently serving our country and protecting our freedom. If you have some words of kindness or artwork to contribute you may do so by
clicking here.  All submissions are posted in the order they are recieved.  Only positive up lifting comments will be used.

Thanks America

Armed Forces Tribute
Thank You Graphic
Something To Consider
A Simple Thank You
A Video Tribute From Anheusr Busch
Journalism Photo's of the year

From John In Miami

 

 

 

 


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Here is a link to a beautiful tribute.  All links are tested to be virus free.

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I would like to say thank you to all of the brave U.S. Servicemen and women who are putting themselves in harms way on a daily basis in Iraq and around the world. Your courage and deternmination is a debt which can never be repaid. We love you, miss you everyday and pray for your safe return. Please fight the good fight and come home soon.

Bob,
Daytona Beach, Fl

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Something to consider........

I sat in my seat of the Boeing 767 waiting for everyone to hurry and stow their carry-ons and grab a seat so we could start what I was sure to be a long, uneventful flight home.

With the huge capacity and slow moving people taking their time to stuff luggage far too big for the overhead and never paying much attention to holding up the growing line behind them, I simply shook my head knowing that this flight was not starting out very well. I was anxious to get home to see my loved ones so I was focused on my issues and just felt like standing up and yelling for some of these clowns to get their act together.

I knew I couldn't say a word so I just thumbed thru the "Sky Mall" magazine from the seat pocket in front of me.

You know it's really getting rough when you resort to the over priced, useless sky mall mag to break the monotony.

With everyone finally seated, we just sat there with the cabin door open and no one in any hurry to get us going although we were well past the scheduled take off time.

No wonder the airline industry is in trouble I told myself. Just then, the attendant came on the intercom to inform us all that we were being delayed. The entire plane let out a collective groan. She resumed speaking to say "We are holding the aircraft for some very special people who are on their way to the plane and the delay shouldn't be more than 5 minutes".

The word came after waiting six times as long as we were promised that I was finally going to be on my way home. Why the hoopla over "these" folks? I was expecting some celebrity or sport figure to be the reason for the hold up ... Just get their butts in a seat and let's hit the gas I thought.

The attendant came back on the speaker to announce in a loud and excited voice that we were being joined by several U.S. Marines returning home from Iraq!!! Just as they walked on board, the entire plane erupted into applause. The men were a bit taken by surprise by the 340 people cheering for them as they searched for their seats. They were having their hands shook and touched by almost everyone who was within an arm's distance of them as they passed down the aisle. One elderly woman kissed the hand of one of the Marines as he passed by her.

The applause, whistles and cheering didn't stop for a long time.

When we were finally airborne, I was not the only civilian checking his conscience as to the delays in "me" getting home, finding my easy chair, a cold beverage and the remote in my hand.

These men had done for all of us and I had been complaining silently about "me" and "my" issues I took for granted: the everyday freedoms I enjoy and the conveniences of the American way of life.

I took for granted that others had paid the price for my ability to moan and complain about a few minutes delay to "me" while those Heroes were going home to their loved ones.

I attempted to get my selfish outlook back in order and minutes before we landed, I suggested to the attendant that she announce over the speaker a request for everyone to remain in their seats until our heroes were allowed to gather their things and be first off the plane.

The cheers and applause continued until the last Marine stepped off and we all rose to go about our too often taken for granted everyday freedoms.

I felt proud of them.

I felt it an honor and a privilege to be among the first to welcome them home and say "Thank You for a job well done."

I vowed that I will never forget that flight nor the lesson learned. I can't say it enough, THANK YOU to those Veteran sand active servicemen and women who may read this and a prayer for those who cannot because they are no longer with us.

Author Unknown
Submitted by
David C.
LeRoy N.Y.

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A Simple Thank You 

 

Last week, while traveling to Chicago on business, I noticed a Marine sergeant traveling with a folded flag, but did not put two and two together. After we boarded our flight, I turned to the sergeant, who'd been invited to sit in First Class (across from me), and inquired if he was heading home.

 

No, he responded.

 

Heading out I asked?

 

No. I'm escorting a soldier home.

 

Going to pick him up?

 

No. He is with me right now. He was killed in Iraq .  I'm taking him home to his family.

 

The realization of what he had been asked to do hit me like a punch to the gut. It was an honor for him. He told me that, although he didn't know the soldier, he had delivered the news of his passing to the soldier's family and felt as if he knew them after many conversations in so few days. I turned back to him, extended my hand, and said, Thank you. Thank you for doing what you do so my family and I can do what we do.

 

Upon landing in Chicago the pilot stopped short of the gate and made the following announcement over the intercom.

 

"Ladies and gentlemen, I would like to note that we have had the honor of having Sergeant Steeley of the United States Marine Corps join us on this flight. He is escorting a fallen comrade back home to his family. I ask that you please remain in your seats when we open the forward door to allow Sergeant Steeley to deplane and receive his fellow soldier. We will then turn off the seat belt sign."

 

Without a sound, all went as requested. I noticed the sergeant saluting the casket as it was brought off the plane, and his action made me realize that I am proud to be an American. 

 

So here's a public Thank You to our military Men and Women for what you do so we can live the way we do.

 

Stuart , Washington , D.C.

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Below is a great video tribute from Anheuser Busch and it represents the way we should treat these men and women when they come into our presence. With the respect and reverence they deserve. Click the play button to view it. If you cannot see the video click here to download it.

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Journalism Photo's of the year

Here are two very very touching photos honored as this year's International Picture of the Year.  

First Place

Todd Heisler The Rocky Mountain News

When 2nd Lt. James Cathey's body arrived at the Reno Airport, Marines climbed into the cargo hold of the plane and draped the flag over his casket as passengers watched the family gather on the tarmac.  

During the arrival of another Marine's casket last year at Denver International Airport, Major Steve Beck described the scene as so powerful: "See the people in the windows?  They sat right there in the plane, watching those Marines.  You gotta wonder what's going through their minds, knowing that they're on the plane that brought him home," he said. "They will remember being on that plane for the rest of their lives.  They're going to remember bringing that Marine home. And they should."

 

Second Place

 

Second Place

Todd Heisler The Rocky Mountain News

The night before the burial of her husband's body, Katherine Cathey refused to leave the casket, asking to sleep next to his body for the last time. The Marines made a bed for her, tucking in the sheets below the flag. Before she fell asleep, she opened her laptop computer and played songs that reminded her of 'Cat,' and one of the Marines asked if she wanted them to continue standing watch as she slept. "I think it would be kind of nice if you kept doing it," she said. "I think that's what he would have wanted."

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I would just like to say thank you to all of those who are sacrificing overseas and all of those who are sacrificing at home for their loved ones overseas.  I hope more than anything that you may be together again soon.

John, Miami, Fl
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